Posts Tagged ‘heart’

In my post titled “Cross Training, Health and Fat Loss“, I mentioned that cardio training will help you in both your fat loss and strength training programs. Your heart is made up of a group of muscles that work together to pump blood throughout your body. These muscles benefit from exercise in much the same way your arm and leg muscles benefit when they are exercised.

Cardio Training is designed to exercise your heart muscles, increase your lung capacity and reduce the causes of stress within your body.

Heart attacks often happen when arteries to the heart are either blocked or have restricted blood flow. Numerous studies have shown that cardio interval training helps the body create new blood vessels to the heart. These smaller blood vessels supply extra blood when you are exercising and your heart muscles need more blood flow and they can supply blood to your heart if your primary blood vessels become partially blocked. These extra blood vessels are effective in reducing your risk of a heart attack simply by being present as an alternative route for the blood to reach the heart if needed.

The best way to prevent a heart attack is to eat healthy and avoid other risk factors such as smoking but adding cardio training to your routine sure helps create a little extra insurance.

Some recent studies have shown that aggressive strength training can help your muscles stay young at the cellular level. I haven’t seen any studies that have shown that a good strong cardio training program will keep your heart young but I’m willing to bet it helps.

Cardio training is also a great way to reduce stress. Swimming, jogging, yoga and walking are just a few of the different types of exercises that give your cardiovascular system a workout.

Why wouldn’t you want to add cardio training to your healthy diet and strength training when stronger heart muscles, increased lung capacity, increased metabolism, increased blood flow and reduced body stress are possible benefits?

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Ask Dr. Wayne Garland a specialist in natural remedies and natural products.



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I know you’ve been taught the importance of calcium for good bones but phosphorus is another of the 9 minerals that are used in your bones. 88% of the Phosphorus you have in your body is found in your bones. In addition to being an important part of your bone structure; the remaining 12% of the phosphorous in your body is used by your brain, heart, kidneys, nerves, and teeth.

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the method used to deliver cellular energy. Phosphorous is a vital component in the structural framework of both RNA and DNA. Cell growth and repair uses phosphorous in the cell membrane. The calcium and sugar metabolisms are influenced by phosphorous and oxygen delivery and utilization is affected by the phosphorous attached to your hemoglobin. Phosphorous helps your body maintain the proper pH balance and helps with a number of enzymes and hormones.

Phosphorous is utilized by almost everything that lives so a balanced diet will generally provide all the dietary phosphorous you’ll need with some of the foods sources for phosphorous being: whole grains, seeds, nuts, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy products.

We usually excrete excess phosphorous when we urinate so an excess is uncommon. Phosphorous deficiencies aren’t common in properly nourished people but some of the signs of deficiency may be: obesity, weight loss, loss of appetite, nervousness, irregular breathing and fatigue.

Phosphorous, calcium and vitamin D interact with each other so improper levels of one will affect the levels of other two.

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Presented by Natural Remedies Products Staff - Natural Remedies Products

Ask Dr. Wayne Garland a specialist in natural remedies and natural products.



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